Ramblings on No Code and the Permanent Revolution

Since leaving Borealis I’ve spent time some time getting to know “no code.” Low Code Application Platforms (LCAPs), or “low” or “no code,” “No Code,” seem to have broken through. The promise is that non-programmers can point-and-click their way through building mobile/web Apps and deploy them with a click.

Connecting Humans with What They Need

A year ago I wrote that 2016 would be the year that consumer AI went mainstream. In one sense, I was wrong. The average consumer still doesn’t interact with an AI application on a typical day. Siri, Cortana, Google Home, and Allo are making inroads but still have small reach when compared to, say, AndroidContinue reading “Connecting Humans with What They Need”

Why Consumer AI Goes Mainstream in 2016

In October of 1994, Netscape released Netscape Navigator 1.0, the first commercial web browser. Over the next decade, the web went mainstream as it became increasingly usable. In October of 2011, Apple announced that Siri — the mobile personal assistant it acquired in 2010 — would ship on the iPhone 4S. Siri has continued to improve, as have GoogleContinue reading “Why Consumer AI Goes Mainstream in 2016”

Metrics vs. Depth

I often see teams that maniacally focus on their metrics around customer acquisition and retention. This usually works well for customer acquisition, but not so well for retention. Why? For many products, metrics often describe the customer acquisition goal in enough detail to provide sufficient management guidance. In contrast, the metrics for customer retention doContinue reading “Metrics vs. Depth”

How BuzzFeed built value by designing awesome experiences inside other platforms

In some recent client work, an emerging theme is that consumer tech. / media start-ups no longer control the most important bits of their UI. Today, if you’re a consumer technology or digital media company, nearly all of your customers will first encounter you through a channel like Facebook, Instagram, twitter, an app store orContinue reading “How BuzzFeed built value by designing awesome experiences inside other platforms”

Pre-Apocalyptic Detroit

The New York Times Magazine ran a breathless story on the “rebirth” of Detroit. In part, the story was told through the eyes of Dan Gilbert, the CEO of mortgage machine Quicken Loans. Memorable quote: One of Gilbert’s new downtown properties is an iconic Kahn creation from 1959 called Chase Tower, previously the National BankContinue reading “Pre-Apocalyptic Detroit”

Being a better media junkie

So I’ve already posted about trendspottr; I love how it surfaces trending tweets about particular topics. It’s not perfect, but the throwaway nature of twitter means that it doesn’t have to be. And it’s helped me discover a lot of interesting stuff, quickly – I surf less, and know more. I’ve been using trendspottr withContinue reading “Being a better media junkie”